nocomment.
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dad-isms:

Everyone wants to know how to be successful, but for some reason, the advice or steps never seen to resonate…so what does an unsuccessful person look like?

1. They go to bed late and sleep late.

2. They don’t like ‘to do’ lists.

3. They give the bare minimum at work believing (falsely) that…

True, thanks dad.

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(Source: beeishappy)

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latimes:

Up, up and away: A state report projects that California’s population will increase by 39% by 2060, and become increasingly diverse with Latinos anticipated to comprise of nearly half of the state’s population.

So if you thought the traffic was bad now, just imagine how it’ll be with 52.7 million total residents in just 47 years. Cross your fingers that flying cars are invented by then to ease congestion.

Read more about the report, or tackle the study in its entirety here.

Good grief

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Q: What would you do with a man who refuses to use a deodorant, seldom bathes, and doesn’t even own a toothbrush?

A: Absolutely nothing.

Pauline Friedman Phillips, aka Abigail Van Buren who wrote the Dear Abby advice column from 1956 to 2002. Phillips died Wednesday at 94.  (via latimes)
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dad-isms:

Was 2011 better than 2012 (honestly)?

Do you think 2013 will be better than 2012?

Of course, no one goes into a New Year believing they will be worse off than the year before and fewer would admit to sabotaging their lives on purpose, but how do some people seemingly get better with age while…

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latimes:

When a Belgian malinois named Cora returned from a deployment as a bomb-detecting dog in Iraq, there wasn’t yet a name for the condition that left her startled by loud noises, growling often and acting aggressively toward other dogs. Now, it’s known as canine PTSD, and military dog specialists are learning how to effectively treat it. 

Walter Burghardt Jr., chief of behavioral medicine and military working-dog studies at [Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio], estimates that at least 10% of the hundreds of dogs sent to Iraq and Afghanistan to protect U.S. troops have developed canine PTSD.

Successful treatment can include conditioning a dog to sources of stress, retraining and the use of anti-anxiety medication. Burghart estimates that about half of military dogs with canine PTSD and related problems are retired, but many return to military work or related fields. 
Photo: Cora with Marine Cpl. Drew Daniel Adams. Credit: Tony Perry / Los Angeles Times

Poor puppies :-(

latimes:

When a Belgian malinois named Cora returned from a deployment as a bomb-detecting dog in Iraq, there wasn’t yet a name for the condition that left her startled by loud noises, growling often and acting aggressively toward other dogs. Now, it’s known as canine PTSD, and military dog specialists are learning how to effectively treat it. 

Walter Burghardt Jr., chief of behavioral medicine and military working-dog studies at [Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio], estimates that at least 10% of the hundreds of dogs sent to Iraq and Afghanistan to protect U.S. troops have developed canine PTSD.

Successful treatment can include conditioning a dog to sources of stress, retraining and the use of anti-anxiety medication. Burghart estimates that about half of military dogs with canine PTSD and related problems are retired, but many return to military work or related fields. 

Photo: Cora with Marine Cpl. Drew Daniel Adams. Credit: Tony Perry / Los Angeles Times

Poor puppies :-(

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Yikes

Yikes

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